KBraune

Jul 27
Jul 27
webs-we-weave:

lovelysinematic:

Motionless In White at Warped Tour 2012

Ass ass ass ass ass ass ass ass ass ass ass

webs-we-weave:

lovelysinematic:

Motionless In White at Warped Tour 2012

Ass ass ass ass ass ass ass ass ass ass ass

Jul 27
custard-cup:

New tattoo 👌

custard-cup:

New tattoo 👌

Jul 27
of-rats-and-dudes:

A Little Bit of Truth // You Me at Six
not my photo, just my edit. credit here

of-rats-and-dudes:

A Little Bit of Truth // You Me at Six

not my photo, just my edit. credit here

Jul 27
Jul 27
miserabelia:

all day I dream about my sushi socks

miserabelia:

all day I dream about my sushi socks

Jul 27

"Brother hangs! @mikeywayofficial" [x]

"Brother hangs! @mikeywayofficial" [x]

Jul 27
Jul 27
wishcandy:

i’ve got more frozen sweets painting ideas. coming soon. i want this popsicle right now.

wishcandy:

i’ve got more frozen sweets painting ideas. coming soon. i want this popsicle right now.

Jul 27
havsglimt:

Is this the way a toy feels when its batteries run dry? [x]

havsglimt:

Is this the way a toy feels when its batteries run dry? [x]

Jul 27
Jul 27

griseus:

It’s moth week and I can’t be out!!

The fish family Pegasidae, aka sea moths, includes just five species (placed in two genera) but is represented in temperate and tropical coastal zones throughout the Indo-Pacific. All sea moths are small (no more than than ~180 mm total length), benthic (bottom-dwelling), and very well camouflaged. Seamoths have modified pelvic fins that allow them to “walk” across the sea bottom where they live.

A curious behavior seen in these fish (almost in Eurypegasus draconis) is that they sheds their skins in one piece, probably every one to five days, a process described in some detail by Herold and Clark (1993). These researcher also discuss evidence suggesting monogamy in this species, as well as other aspects of social and reproductive behavior.

Jul 27
asapscience:

“A large school of mobula rays fades into the waters of Baja, Mexico. “The rays were moving quite fast and it was hard enough keeping up with them from the surface, let alone diving down to take a closer look,” writes photographer Eduardo Lopez Negrete. Mobula rays are often referred to as flying rays due to their fondness for breaching.” — the 2014 National Geographic Traveller Photo ContestLet’s also keep in mind that a mobula ray can reach 17 foot (5.2 meter) wingspan and weigh over a ton. Freaky or cool? 
via Sploid

asapscience:

A large school of mobula rays fades into the waters of Baja, Mexico. “The rays were moving quite fast and it was hard enough keeping up with them from the surface, let alone diving down to take a closer look,” writes photographer Eduardo Lopez Negrete. Mobula rays are often referred to as flying rays due to their fondness for breaching.” — the 2014 National Geographic Traveller Photo Contest

Let’s also keep in mind that a mobula ray can reach 17 foot (5.2 meter) wingspan and weigh over a ton. Freaky or cool? 

via Sploid

Jul 27
Jul 27